SOME POINTS TO PONDER

  • In future schools would we need teachers?

  • Is the futuristic dream of high-tech classrooms really in the best interests of the next generation?

  • If you look at the best-performing education systems, they’ve been very cautious about using technology in their classroom, according to an OECD Report.

  • The pedagogy emphasizes the role of imagination in learning and takes a holistic approach that integrates the intellectual, practical, and creative development of pupils.

  • Children learn best by expressing themselves through artistic activities, such as painting and drawing rather, than consuming information downloaded onto a tablet.

  • As a child in the classroom, it is usually field trips, getting our hands dirty in a lab or a beautiful story are the things that stay with us.

  • Lessons are delivered by a human being that not only cares about the child’s education but also about them as individuals.

  • Children in an ‘engaged classroom’ are very much absorbed in their work and to do that sufficient ‘space’ is required.

  • Exams capture a student’s ability to provide a snapshot of a field in motion, like photography. What we want is to capture the ongoing inquiry, where a premium is placed that many of our future beliefs will be substantially different from our present ones.

  • Library is a space where we encounter information and knowledge. It is a space for discovery and enjoyment. Reinvent a Library - Plan a space that encourages students to gather information not just from books and technology but also from listening to other people’s stories and points of view. The idea is to give them an insight into different life paths. The library is not what objects it holds, but rather how those objects are used. Libraries hold far more than just books; they hold objects like CDs, DVDs, magazines, newspapers, maps, artwork, electronic databases, computers, and printers. But they also offer things we’re less quick to identify as objects: space, relationships, trust, understanding, and opportunities. We must recognize that libraries speak to the whole person, not just the intellect.

  • The most powerful computer is our brain.

  • Teaching is about human contact and interaction. No ‘technology’ can replace a human touch. Teachers will always be required; expectations will change. Like in earlier times, teachers will have to ‘own’ their profession and their students.